- Education

3 Ways to Improve Your Landscape Photography

Whether you love shooting urban landscape or the great outdoors, successful outdoor photoshoots can be tough to master. We’ve compiled three simple steps to help you up your game and take advantage of the beautiful environment that surrounds you.

Always Shoot in Raw

Beginners and veterans alike have heard a thousand times to always shoot in RAW. RAW images are unmodified compilations of your sensors data. This means RAW images include all the data from the sensor, giving you more to work with in post production.

When you shoot in JPEG, images are compressed and data is lost, so when you are editing in post, every edit takes more data away. With RAW, you will have a greater range of edits to make, especially exposure, white balance, and color correction. You’ll get your best pictures and edits when you shoot in RAW.

Beat the Rush

Outdoor photography is all about angles, natural light, and getting away from the crowd. If you’re looking to snap that panorama, find some wildlife, or capture an early morning fog over the mountains, get out early or late. Don’t be afraid to set your alarm before sunrise!

The problem with the sun is when it’s at its fullest, your subjects and landscape look their worst. The early morning or late afternoon hours give you the “golden hour” of sunlight. Landscape, outdoor portraits, and wildlife shots all benefit from this rule.

It’s All About Settings

Shooting in manual mode will really help you get the most out of your camera and give you the best image possible. Outdoor photography requires a lot of attention to your settings.

If you are trying to blur the background and keep a subject in focus, you’ll want to use a large aperture. Capturing an entire landscape means a smaller aperture but may require you to turn up your ISO and lower your shutter speed.

No matter what you choose to do with your settings, make sure and bring a tripod. A tripod is your best friend with outdoor photography.

When it’s all said and done, the best way to improve your outdoor photography is to grab your camera, photography backpack, and other gear and just get out and go shoot. You won’t get better at photography unless you practice.